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The Son Of Man–Part 6

The Son Of Man–Part 6

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.  Luke 19:10

Have you ever given up hope? Everybody has experiences that bring them low enough to lose hope in something, spiritual or otherwise. When this occurs, our Lord gives us an example by never giving up on a man like Peter who believed that He was the Son of God. But notice also that he did not give up on those who gave up on God. In Luke 19, the Lord did not give up on such a man. Zacchaeus, being a Jew, was likely raised to fear God, but made a decision to live life without hope in God and instead trusted in riches. The Son of Man found this man, and showed that it is not impossible for God to bring a rich man into the Kingdom of God, as difficult as it might be (Luke 18:24-27). Zacchaeus finds no lesser place than full fellowship with the God he disowned. The man who didn’t give up on Zacchaeus is not a mere man, but the Son of Man who came to seek and to save those who are lost.

Luke gives us an example of an upstanding Jew by introducing us to a man named Simeon. This Jerusalemite was “just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel” (Luke 2:25). In contrast, Zacchaeus was marked by the faithful Jews of Jericho as a traitor to his nation, who stole from his own countrymen. He worked for the enemy, the Roman Empire, and clearly wasn’t looking for Israel to regain sovereignty over Immanuel’s Land as God promised. Zacchaeus was none of the things which Simeon was, yet there was a place for him in the kingdom. Such is the grace of God.

On the day Zacchaeus encountered the Lord, he didn’t know it would be the last time Jesus would pass through Jericho. Yet Jesus paused in this once-cursed city, looked up to a man despised by Jews, and requested fellowship with him for his blessing. The response is without pause. The reaction is without contemplation. Zacchaeus, in the final opportunity of his life to respond directly to the Son of Man on earth, receives Him joyfully. Though the Lord stated that it would be difficult for those “that have riches to enter into the kingdom of God”, Zacchaeus showed that he no longer prioritized amassing wealth for his own purposes (Luke 18:24). “The things which are impossible with men are possible with God” (Luke 18:27). Do you have loved ones who are yet unsaved? At times we tend to despair, thinking they will never be saved despite our many prayers. Yet all things are possible for God, and it is God who saves.

Why did salvation come to Zacchaeus? The answer is in verse 10: because “the Son of Man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.” The Son of Man came to look for and save a man who had lost hope in His everlasting dominion; a man who gained riches by open thievery. Zacchaeus was clearly the lost. Perhaps the crowning attribute of God toward believers is His grace. Each and every one of us was once hopelessly lost. Yet not only does He deliver us but He desires fellowship with us, as was the case with Zacchaeus. Far beyond what we deserve, we are able to know the fullness of joy in fellowship with the Father and His Son Jesus Christ (1 John 1:4). We experience this in a specific way as the Lord Himself comes to meet with us each Lord’s Day, when we gather to Him. We were no better than Zacchaeus, yet the Son of Man came to seek and to save us.


Mitchell Taylor is in fellowship with his wife in the assembly that meets in Taylorside Gospel Hall, Saskatchewan (Canada). He is employed as a High School Teacher. 

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