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The Son Of Man–Part 3

The Son Of Man–Part 3

And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of Man.  John 3:13

The title “Son of Man” was the choice title used by the Lord Jesus Christ when speaking about Himself. This title conveys several aspects of our Lord which give us reason to worship Him. While in prophetic events, the term “Son of Man” has special significance for Israel, in redemptive events the Son of Man has given “His life a ransom for many” (Mt 20:28).

One sense in which the term “son” is used in Scripture is to demonstrate progeny. An example where son means a descendant is when Bartimaeus cried out to the Lord, “Jesus, Son of David…” (Mk 10:47). Indeed the Lord was the offspring of David. However, He clarifies that though He is the offspring of man, He has no part in the federal headship of Adam, the source of our sin nature. The title “Son of Man” doesn’t denote that He has been born of a man; instead the Lord told Nicodemus that “[The Son of Man] came down from heaven” (John 3:13). The Lord also told the murmuring professing disciples “What and if ye shall see the Son of Man ascend up where he was before?” (John 6:62). Our Lord came to earth at incarnation as the Son of Man, never being infected by sin, giving Him qualification to satisfy God as “a ransom for many.”

Notice also, that being called a son can designate character. James and John were called “sons of thunder” because of their character. Joses the Levite was known as Barnabas, “son of consolation,” because he was known for comforting and encouraging others. Even so the Son of Man characterizes all that God intended mankind to be.

As a child our Lord was continually increasing “in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man” (Luke 2:52). At baptism, when others would bring forth their “fruits worthy of repentance,” our Lord would enter the waters without anything to repent from. Adam failed in the garden, but met with the same tempter in the wilderness the Son of Man never moved outside of God’s will (Luke 4:1-12). In Gethsemane, we find the Lord in agony, praying with great intensity as He faces the cross. He said, “Father, If Thou be willing, remove this cup from Me: nevertheless, not My will, but Thine, be done.” (Luke 22:42) After this season of prayer, as Judas came and kissed Him, He replied, “Judas, betrayest thou the Son of Man with a kiss?” Wicked men’s hearts were so far away from what God desired it to be, while the Lord demonstrated that He was all that God intended for a man to be: the Perfect Man.

The Man who was everything that God intended a human to be has taken the place of many who were nothing that God intended him to be. In Romans, Paul considers that it is rare for someone to die for another who is righteous in man’s eyes. For someone even better, a good man, it is a little more probable though highly unlikely. Yet while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us (Rom 5:7-8). “Man will not sacrifice himself for an unworthy object but Christ did exactly that.”[1]

[1] Albert Leckie, Romans: A commentary on chapters 1-8 (Fareham UK: Precious Seed Publications, 2007), 74.


Mitchell Taylor is in fellowship with his wife in the assembly that meets in Taylorside Gospel Hall, Saskatchewan (Canada). He is employed as a High School Teacher. 

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