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I Will Not Go Out Free–Part 4

I Will Not Go Out Free–Part 4

We come now to the conclusion of our Hebrew servant: I will not go out free. We have considered the three premises that lead to his judgement and noted that the basis for all was love. Love for his master, wife and children, thus, he makes only one decision–I will not go out free.

As we have progressed, we have viewed these expressions as typifying the love of Christ. Love for His Father, love for His wife, and love for His children. We have considered the conclusion in passing in each instance, but let's now survey it in more detail.

When the Hebrew servant declared I will not go out free, he gave an insight into his priorities. The law permitted him to walk away. He had paid his debt and was now legally free. But something compelled him to stay; something that went well beyond his commercial arrangement. In the intervening period he had made a commitment, and in taking a bride, he had committed himself to her. He would not abandon her and her children and walk out free. He valued the bond that had been formed. And so he walks to the door, and in a very public show of self-sacrifice, allows his master to bore through his ear. None are left in doubt: this man has chosen to forego his freedom.

Compare this to modern society where decisions are based on what feels good or what pays well. We are actively encouraged to 'be true to oneself' and do what liberates us. Liberty is, of course, self-defined. Old fashioned 'social constructs' such as family, society, and morality, are sacrificed upon the altar of freedom and autonomy. The days when a man stuck with something because he had committed to do so are gone.

There is no greater example of love like this than the Lord Jesus, in fact, He is the example. In Philippians 2, the apostle Paul shows the extent of that love. He starts by asserting that because He is in the 'form of God', Christ had the ultimate right to insist upon equality with God. But instead, he does the opposite. One translation states that he did not count it as 'a thing to be grasped' but instead 'He made Himself of no reputation and took the form of a servant.' In response to the eternal redemption plan, the Son of God left the glory of Heaven and came to earth to do the Father's will. He made Himself.

There was no force on the part of the Father, and no resistance on the part of the Son. Instead, the Son laid aside His right to liberty and 'humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death.' Hear the reverberations in eternity as the Son cries; 'I love my Father, I love my bride, I love my children; I will not go out free.' The Psalmist David draws on the inspiration of the self-sacrificing servant and refers to the 'open ear' (Psalm 40:6) of the Messiah that would come. The inspired Hebrew writer picks it up, and translates it as a 'prepared body.' Thus the ear opened by an aul, finds its equivalent action in a body prepared for obedience: 'I come to do Thy will O God' (Heb. 10:9).

As we remember Him again today, let us remind ourselves of the Supreme Hebrew Servant, and thank God for those immortal words: I will not go out free...a body Thou hast prepared me.'

Biula, Angola

Biula, Angola

C. H. Mackintosh on the Vitality of the Eternal Sonship of Christ

C. H. Mackintosh on the Vitality of the Eternal Sonship of Christ