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My Beloved: His Head

My Beloved: His Head

The Shunammite woman in the Song of Solomon is asked a very telling question: "What is your beloved above another beloved?" The response is clear and unashamed; "My Beloved is…the chiefest among ten thousand.”

In this series of Lord's Day Morning devotionals, we will take a look at a selection of the features presented in Song of Solomon chapter 5 and trace them through the life of the Lord Jesus. This week we commence with “His Head” (Song 5:11).

Says the Shunammite, “His head is as the most fine gold.” Using a beautiful simile she compares the head of her beloved to the most expensive substance she can imagine. But not just any gold, most fine gold! The best of the best.

We learn from the New Testament teaching on the church as a body, that the head is presented as a picture of that which controls and directs. It is the centre of thought and discernment. It houses the intelligence and the rationale. How wonderful to consider the Lord Jesus as one whose thinking was “as most fine gold.” Everything He did was perfect, because everything He thought was perfect.

We find this difficult to comprehend. It is easier to comprehend the fact that the Lord Jesus did no wrong, because we have managed, through the power of the Spirit within us, to gain an element of control over our actions. But which of us can say the same about our thoughts? Even the best of christians would be embarrassed if their every thought was put on display for all to see. Yet our Saviour had complete control over His mind. Never did an intemperate, ill-conceived, illegitimate, self-centred, irrational thought go through His mind.

Yet when we come to the gospels, the Lord Jesus Himself says; “the Son of Man hath not where to lay His head” (Ma 8:20). What a condescension! The One whose head is as most fine gold, had nowhere to lay it at night. Even the foxes have holes, and the birds have nests! Praise God for one dear lady,  who in preparation for His burial, took an alabaster box of ointment and “poured it on His head” (Ma 26:7). What an appreciation of His head of gold.

This act isa stark contrast to what His enemies did to Him. Says Matthew, they “platted a crown of thorns and put it on His head” (Ma 27:29) and “took a reed and smote Him on the head” (Ma 27:30) and finally they “set up over His head his accusation” (Ma 27:37). A head of most fine gold, reviled, rebuked and ridiculed.

But notice what John records; “He said ‘It is finished:’ and He bowed His head, and gave up the ghost” (Jn. 19:30). The head of most fine gold was always in control even to the very last.

Paul reminds us that after He had died the Father of Glory raised Him to life, and placed Him at His own right hand, above everything else, past, present and future, “and gave Him to be the head over all things to the church” (Eph 1:22). Well might we sing:

The Head that once was crowned with thorns
Is crowned with glory now;
A royal diadem adorns
The mighty Victor's brow.
Thomas Kelly (1820)

Mervyn Hall is in fellowship with his wife in the assembly that meets in Hebron Gospel Hall in Bicester (UK) and is employed as a business consultant to the Healthcare industry. 

We Have A Great High Priest (Part 2)

We Have A Great High Priest (Part 2)

Notable Citations: The Heir Of All Things [David Gooding]

Notable Citations: The Heir Of All Things [David Gooding]